This rich and luscious blueberry spinach smoothie bowl is one of my FAVORITE breakfasts (and snacks!). It’s stuffed with nutritional superstars including spinach, wild blueberries, chia and hemp seeds (for protein and fiber) and coconut oil or nut butter (for healthy fats), but it has a sweet, creamy flavor that even my kids adore. (Trust me, if Ella – who is highly suspicious of green stuff in her smoothie – loves this so will you!)

Close-up of blueberry spinach smoothie in a bowl with maple buckwheat clusters on top.

Blueberry spinach smoothie

The base for this smoothie comes from frozen wild blueberries and a frozen banana. Wild blueberries have twice the amount of antioxidants as regular blueberries, and my kids love them. They will eat bowls of the frozen berries with a spoon (strange but true), and I love to bake them into these muffins and oatmeal bars. Buying the berries frozen is not only cheaper than fresh, but it also means the berries are available year-round!

I also always keep frozen bananas in the freezer which lend creaminess and sweetness to this smoothie (meaning no ice, dairy or sugar needed!!). Whenever I have bananas leftover at the end of the week (or if they start to get overripe), I peel them and pop them into a bag in the freezer for smoothies (they can also be defrosted and used in baked goods such as this gluten-free banana bread or these banana breakfast cookies).

Overhead close-up shot of the smoothie in the blender.

While you can certainly drink this blueberry spinach smoothie out of a glass, I’m a sucker for foods that can be eaten with a spoon. From pudding, to porridge, to ice cream, there’s something luxurious about curling up with a bowl and a single utensil. Maybe that’s why I’ve always eaten my smoothies with a spoon (it’s just more fun that way!).

Blueberry spinach smoothie bowl

I therefore usually eat this thick smoothie in bowl form, often topped with maple buckwheat clusters (recipe below), which are made by quickly toasting buckwheat groats with a bit of maple syrup and cinnamon. The sweet, salty and crunchy clusters are the perfect counterpoint to the creamy smoothie, although you could go for toasted nuts or granola instead.

Buckwheat groats in a skillet for the maple buckwheat clusters.
Close-up of the maple buckwheat clusters on a piece of parchment paper.

How to make a blueberry spinach smoothie (no yogurt!)

When you’re making smoothies, it’s a good idea to add the liquid to the container first, which will help the other ingredients to circulate around the blade. In this case, I go for unsweetened almond milk or hemp milk, but you could use any milk you drink. Next, add the frozen fruit. Then pile in the spinach (a full 2 cups for this recipe!), and any add-ins, such as the hemp seeds, chia seeds and coconut oil. I also add a touch of cinnamon for sweetness. Blend the smoothie on high until it’s smooth and rich (I use my Vitamix, which is one of my favorite kitchen tools).

Process shot divided into four quadrants, showing the steps for making a smoothie bowl in the blender, starting with adding the milk, then the frozen fruit, followed by the spinach.

The result is a nutrition-packed smoothie with a naturally sweet flavor and creamy texture that I think you’ll love.

Tips for making this blueberry spinach smoothie:

  • I use my Vitamix to whip up this thick smoothie bowl, but any blender will work. If the smoothie is too thick to circulate around the blade (in a regular blender), scrape the sides often and add more milk as needed (it might be too thin to eat with a spoon, but it will still be delicious!). If using a Vitamix, use the tamper to stir as you blend.
  • You can use any milk you like! I go for unsweetened almond milk or hemp milk.
  • The frozen banana is essential for the smoothie’s thick texture. If you use a fresh banana the smoothie will be much thinner (the same goes for the blueberries!).
  • If you’d like, swap out 1/2 cup of the frozen wild blueberries for 1/2 cup of frozen raspberries.
  • Adding virgin coconut oil or nut butter provides healthy fats, helping your body metabolize the fat-soluble vitamins in the spinach.
  • Chia and hemp seeds give the smoothie a protein and fiber boost (feel free to add just one or both).
  • The maple buckwheat clusters provide a delicious salty-sweet crunch to the smoothie bowl but are optional. You can use granola or chopped toasted nuts instead.

Other healthy (and vegan!) breakfasts to try:

Get the recipe!

Blueberry Spinach Smoothie Bowl with Maple Buckwheat Clusters (Vegan, Gluten-Free)

These smoothie bowls are packed with good-for-you ingredients, but you’d never know it! You can drink the smoothie in a glass, or serve it in a bowl with a spoon (yes, please!). The sweet, salty and crunchy maple buckwheat clusters are the perfect counterpoint to the creamy smoothie but are optional (see below for the recipe). Feel free to use granola or chopped toasted nuts instead. To freeze bananas, peel them then store them in an airtight container (or ziptop bag) in the freezer.

Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Keyword blueberry smoothie bowl, blueberry spinach smoothie, healthy smoothie bowl
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 2 people
Author Nicki Sizemore

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsweetened nut or seed milk (such as almond or hemp milk), or any milk you like
  • 1 frozen banana, broken into thirds
  • cups frozen wild blueberries
  • 2 cups tightly packed baby spinach leaves
  • 1 tablespoon virgin coconut oil or nut butter
  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
  • 1 tablespoon hemp seeds
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • Pinch salt
  • Maple Buckwheat Clusters, recipe below (optional)

Instructions

  1. In a blender or Vitamix add the nut or seed milk, followed by the remaining ingredients. Blend on high, stopping and scraping the mixture towards the blades, or using the tamper to stir if you have a Vitamix. Divide the smoothie into bowls and sprinkle with Maple Buckwheat Clusters, if using. Serve immediately.

Recipe Notes

Tips:

  • I use my Vitamix to whip up this thick smoothie bowl, but any blender will work. If the smoothie is too thick to circulate around the blade (in a regular blender), scrape the sides often and add more milk as needed (it might be too thin to eat with a spoon, but it will still be delicious!). If using a Vitamix, use the tamper to stir as you blend.
  • You can use any milk you like! I go for unsweetened almond milk.
  • The frozen banana is essential for the smoothie’s thick texture. If you use a fresh banana the smoothie will be much thinner (the same goes for the blueberries!).
  • If you’d like, swap out 1/2 cup of the frozen wild blueberries for 1/2 cup of frozen raspberries.
  • Adding virgin coconut oil or nut butter provides healthy fats, helping your body metabolize the fat-soluble vitamins in the spinach.
  • Chia and hemp seeds give the smoothie a protein and fiber boost (feel free to add just one or both).
  • The maple buckwheat clusters provide a delicious salty-sweet crunch to the smoothie bowl but are optional. You can use granola or chopped toasted nuts instead.

Maple Buckwheat Clusters (Vegan, Gluten-Free)

Warning: these crunchy, nutty, sweet and salty clusters are so addicting that you might end up finishing them off before they make it to your smoothie bowl! Have the cinnamon, salt and maple syrup ready to go once the buckwheat starts toasting, as the process goes quickly. The clusters are also delicious over yogurt or ice cream.
Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Keyword buckwheat clusters, buckwheat granola
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Author Nicki Sizemore

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup buckwheat groats
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt, plus additional for seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup

Instructions

  1. Line a plate with parchment paper.
  2. Place the buckwheat in a medium nonstick skillet over medium heat. Cook, stirring often, until light golden brown, about 2-3 minutes. Add the cinnamon, salt and maple syrup. Cook, stirring, until the buckwheat is dark golden and the pan looks dry, about 10-15 seconds longer. Transfer to the parchment-lined plate and sprinkle with a touch more salt. Cool completely (the clusters will harden as they cool).

Recipe Notes

Do Ahead: The buckwheat clusters can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days.

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